Faulkner’s Other Works

1924:
The Marble Faun published-Faulkner’s first book which sold very poorly.

1926:
Soldiers’ Pay published-Faulkner’s first novel

1927:
Mosquitoes published-2nd novel, very daring for it’s time because of its sexual references

Writes Flags in the Dust, which is rejected.

 1929:
Sartoris publishes-Faulkner’s third novel, (condensed version of his unpublished Flags in the Dust) introduces the theme, setting and characters from Yoknapatawpha County that are found in his following works

The Sound and the Fury published-known as one of Faulkner’s greatest achievements in literature. Presents the Compson family through the consciousness of different characters

 1930:
As I Lay Dying published-another novel which Faulkner uses stream of consciousness accounts to tell the story. Considered one of his greatest works and the most experimentally daring novel of horror, comedy, and an intellectual nature of being

 1931:
Sanctuary published-Faulkner’s only bestseller. He calls it “the most horrific tale I could imagine.” He wrote it as a novel to reach the public, which his previous novels failed to do.

These 13 published-story collection which includes “A Rose for Emily”, “Victory”, and “Red Leaves.”

 1932:
Light in August published-one of Faulkner’s best works which deals with mixed blood heritage

 1933:
A Green Bough published-Faulkner’s second and last poetry collection. He considered himself a “failed poet.”

 1934:
Doctor Martino and Other Stories published-story collection which includes “Fox Hunt,” “Mountain Victory,” “Smoke,” and “Honor.”

 1935:
Pylon published-considered a minor work for Faulkner, set at a Mardi gras celebration

 1936:
Absalom, Absalom! published-called Faulkner’s masterpiece by many, depicts American and Southern history surrounding and during the Civil War

 1938:
The Unvanquished published-group of previously published short stories

 1939:
The Wild Palms published-two stories that involved juxtaposition about love

 1940:
The Hamlet published-The first of a trilogy which includes “The Town,” and “The Mansion.”

 1942:
Go Down, Moses and Other Stories published-short story collection with the very admirable story “The Bear.”

 1946:
The Portable Faulkner published-edited by Malcolm Cowley, this arrangement of his previously published works is credited with reviving interest in Faulkner

 1948:
Intruder in the Dust published-Faulkner’s response to the “Negro problem.”

 1949:
Knight’s Gambit published-detective genre of a book, many consider it his most pleasant of his published works

1950:
Collected Stories published-Receives the Nobel Prize in literature. 42 short stories which are arranged in six units of different themes

 1951:
Requiem for a Nun published-sequel to “Sanctuary.” Faulkner experiments with different form with three prose sections followed by a three act play.

 1954:
A Fable published-wins the Pulitzer Prize. A novel about the passion of Christ which he considers his masterwork

 1955:
Big Woods published-short story collection which brings together his hunting stories previously printed with one new one “Ride at Morning.”

 1957:
The Town published-sequel to “The Hamlet.”

1958:
New Orleans Sketches published-collection of Faulkner’s experimental prose works written in 1925. This is his transition from poetry to fiction

 1959:
The Mansion published-the final of the trilogy which included “The Hamlet” and “The Town.”

 1962:
The Reivers: A Reminiscence published-wins Pulitzer Prize. Faulkner’s final novel which is a nostalgic look at Yoknapatawpha County

Published on May 5, 2009 at 1:48 am  Leave a Comment  

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